Chalkbeat New York Reporting

Chalkbeat

Since January 2013, I’ve been covering public schools in New York City. Read my articles at http://ny.chalkbeat.org/author/emmasr/.

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Breaking the Silence in Brazil

Foreign Affairs, July 2013.

The massive protests of the past few weeks have demonstrated how deeply Brazilians feel the right to speak out against their government. But just 30 years ago, the country was ruled by a brutal dictatorship that blocked free expression. A group of young playwrights found a way to speak up.

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WHAT’S BEHIND THE MASS STUDENT TAKEOVERS OF ARGENTINA’S HIGH SCHOOLS?

The Atlantic, October 2012.

Three decades after a brutal government crackdown against youth activists, a new generation of students finds political voice. At a public high school here in Argentina’s capital last month, a representative from the city’s ministry of education kept talking over the students. At one point in the meeting, a high-school senior turned to him and […]

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WHEN CULTURE TRUMPS LAW

The Nation, April 2009.

Brazil’s penal code permits abortion in cases of rape, but rights on paper don’t guarantee rights in reality. In November, Adriana gave birth to a child she never wanted and spent two months fighting not to have. The first time Adriana was raped, on January 29, 2008, a stranger forced her into his car and […]

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Demanding Voice and Enduring Silence

Dissent Magainze, March 2013.

What it takes for two women to live as a couple in Rural Brazil, the nation with the largest Roman Catholic population in the world. (READ MORE)

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FAMILIAR BALANCING ACTS: CONVERSATIONS WITH THE WOMEN WE KNOW BEST

Huffington Post, August 2012.

As we create pictures for ourselves of how the generations above us have built their lives, our pictures should include the women — and men — whose daily lives we’ve long observed, but who maybe we’ve never asked how they manage the many roles they play. It’s on us to start asking. We have the […]

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RULES OF TRAVEL

Guernica Magazine, December 2012.

The cities I fall in love with are not necessarily the most exciting—in fact, they rarely are—or the ones I leave with the best stories. They’re sometimes the ones where I am the most boring, where I make the smallest mark, and where there are a few streets I know well, a mango stand on […]

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“PERO PA MI ERA OTRA COSA”: CONTESTED MEMORIES OF PINOCHET’S CHILE

Yale Historical Review,  Spring 2011.

My senior thesis examines responses to a former dictator’s death in 2006 and contested memories of his life and legacy. The range of reactions to Pinochet’s death, and the controversy that ensued over his funeral, suggest that eighteen years after his dictatorship ended, what he meant for Chile—and whether he should be remembered with respect […]

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THE CASE FOR ETIQUETTE

Yale Daily News Magazine, September 2010.

A dinner at Yale Law School teaches students how to blend in enough to stand out. Read the article: The Case for Etiquette

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ON MOBILITY, TRUST, BREAKING NEWS, AND GOING HOME

The Yale Globalist, Spring 2011

Teenagers from the Middle East take a chance on living with people they’ve grown up to hate.  In mid-July, a teenager I had worked with for three weeks asked me if I knew where he was from. I thought Gaza, but I didn’t know for sure. I knew Mohammad was Israeli or Palestinian or […]

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A BIG OPPORTUNITY FOR OBAMA AND LULA

The Christian Science Monitor,  March 13, 2009.

On Saturday, President Obama will meet with Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a steel worker and union leader elected in 2002 on a platform of fighting poverty and inequality in one of the world’s largest developing economies. The meeting itself won’t be as groundbreaking as Obama’s announcement last week of his potential willingness to negotiate with Taliban militants. […]

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PARADOX AND PERSISTENCE: BRAZILIAN WOMEN’S FIGHT FOR RIGHTS IN POLITICS AND AT HOME

Journal of Peasant Studies, October 2009.

Changes in how participatns in a Brazilian women’s movement speak about their work and relate to their husbands are less measurable than successful protests for legal rights. But Vera, a former leader of the women’s movement movement who has seen both kinds of battles—takeovers of government buildings and tough conversations with her husband and sons—insists […]

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